Digital advertising and marketing: only the best ideas worldwide, since 2003

Direct marketing with IM

on May 20, 2004 by Martina Comments

Go where the prospect is… The marketers’ motto can be applied now also to IM softwares loved, in particular, by teenagers. Instant messaging provide great opportunities for brands that want to get in touch with people under 25, as an article on iMedia Connection explains, presenting numbers and few examples of IM used as a marketing tool. The article is pretty good, but it’s important that it has been written by a person who works for a technology provider directly engaged in the IM business.

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Click & win with Debitel

on May 20, 2004 by Martina Comments

German carrier Debitel has launched an MMS based contest named “Fr�hlingsgesicht 2004” (Spring Face). Users can send their pictures with the portrait of funny or beautiful faces and get the chance to win a SPA weekend or a bunch of Siemens MC 60 mobile phones. The campaign is promoted through MSN’s network with dedicated banners and a special section.

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Wireless Paradise City

on May 20, 2004 by Martina Comments

Wireless technology to the Maldives. As Gareth Mitchell reports on BBC NEWS it is now possible to access the Internet with a Wi-Fi connection. The news isn’t a great news, what impressed me is the fact that the BBC’s reporter “had” to travel to the Maldives to write such an article… poor guy!

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Troy’s online promotion

on May 19, 2004 by Martina Comments

Brad Pitt’s latest movie, “Troy” is taking advantage of a massive online promotion. What is curious to note is the fact that the portals chosen to support the initiative differ from country to country. In the Uk, Warner Bros picked Yahoo! (see Revolution Magazine), while in Germany and in Italy the campaign is currently running on MSN (read Pubblicit� Italia).

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Italian online advertising sucks

on May 19, 2004 by Martina Comments

Sebastiano Caccialanza, commercial director at Lycos Italia raises his voice in a desolating market. In an interview on Pubblicit� Italia (in Italian), Mr Caccialanza says: “We can’t be hypocrite: the Italian online advertising isn’t growing, it’s stagnant.”

The market it’s worth about100 million euros since three years. The problem, according to Lycos’ manager is that Italian marketers don’t perceive the Internet as a viable marketing channel.

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“Gooooal”: Nike’s winning advergame

on May 19, 2004 by Martina Comments

The One Show Interactive awards have been assigned last week but only a few online publications have decided to comment the event. AdWeek dedicates a brief overview to the winning campaigns, talking about Nec Corporation “Best of the Show Web Site” and the successful performance of San Francisco’s agency Goodby, Silverstein & Partners who received five Pencils. Nike was nominated One Show Interactive’s Advertiser of the Year for the second year in a row. It won the Gold Pencil in the category “Brand Gaming” for the advergame “Goooal” created by Framfab Denmark. As explained in the agency’s press release the “Goooooal!” game is a turn-based real-time multi-player Flash football game, where the objective, unsurprisingly for a football game, is to outscore your opponent. The game can be still played online at Nikefootball.com.

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The dark future of MMS

on May 19, 2004 by Martina Comments

Mike Grenville on the excellent 160 Characters reports the results of a recent survey on MMS’ usage in the United Kingdom. Mobile operators have no reasons to be happy since: - 83 per cent of mobile phone users are yet to send an MMS - 21% of mobile phone users have so far sent or received an MMS message The main limits to MMS’ diffusion are the price (see recent post), and the fact that users see MMS being complementary to SMS, not a replacement.

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For whom the (mobile) bell rings?

on May 19, 2004 by Martina Comments

The ringtones business is still in its infancy in the US, but the interest of carriers and content providers in getting a piece of the pie, is already high. The problem is that the business model hasn’t been defined yet and there’s confusion in the players’ role in the game. On Reuters (via Yahoo! News) Scott Banarjee analyses the current state of the art of the US ringtones market. Up ’til now in only 5 percent of US cell phone users have downloaded a ringtone but, according to the Yankee Group, the business is expected to grow to $1 billion dollars by 2008.

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Mobile gaming in Asia

on May 19, 2004 by Martina Comments

Is mobile gaming the next killer application? Perhaps… As Telecom Asia reports in an excellent market’s overview, the expectations were (are) big, but it�s only been recently that the mobile industry has seen the first signs that gaming has real growth potential. Asian operators expect revenues grow to $3.2 billion in 2008. South Korea and Japan are the countries in which mobile gaming is growing faster, thanks to the new technologies enabling richer content and advanced interactivity.

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The buzz: behavioural targeting

on May 18, 2004 by Martina Comments

In Italy we have a proverb that says “a vest doesn’t make a monk”. I don’t know if this make sense in English, but I thought it was a good start for a post about behavioural targeting, which is the hot issue of the year. In 2003 the buzz was about contextual advertising, now the discussion is going a step further, analysing not only where the ad is served, but also to whom. There is an increasing demand for personalised services, and the advertising industry needs to adapt to this trend. As Azhar Rafee points out on New Media Age, the concept of behavioural targeting isn’t brand new, but it’s dramatically improved by the Internet:

“Both print and broadcast media have relied on behavioural techniques. But there’s one key difference when we talk about behavioural targeting on the Web: it’s the truest form of targeting because it’s based on real behaviour, not a survey of what consumers say they do.”

Also Ad Age analyses the potentials of behavioural advertising(of course they say “behavioral presenting the case of American Airlines and the Wall Street Journal. The whole sounds rather complicated, but Kris Oser explains it pretty well. Basically, the WSJ track visitors and what they read, combining these data with the information in the users’ database. The “The database-targeting system invisibly creates a virtual audience of a different composition, or a different demographic, than the Web publication’s larger, overall audience. Once they are identified, these segmented audience members can be “followed” around the site and served American Airlines ads, no matter what section of WSJ.com they are reading.”

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