Digital advertising and marketing: only the best ideas worldwide, since 2003

Online campaign for Budget

on May 26, 2004 by Martina Comments

Arthur Frommer’s Budget Travel magazine and Budget Rent A Car System have partnered to offer readers and renters a way to “Travel Large for Less.” As explained in the press release the initiative will be supported by a banner campaign running on MSNBC.com.

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Text & win with Garnier

on May 26, 2004 by Martina Comments

In Spain Garnier has launched a mobile marketing campaign to promote its products “Fructis Style”. The initiative targets young consumers giving away prizes like scooters and videogames. As reported on Marketing Directo consumers can enter the competition by texting the sms code they find on Garnier’s products. The campaign is promoted also through traditional offline channels.

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Good news from the Wireless Summit

on May 26, 2004 by Martina Comments

The interest for wireless entertainment products is growing in the US, as a press release commenting the Global Wireless Summit in LA explains. The predominant opinion of panelists was that 2004 will see doubling if not tripling of mobile content revenues, and that ringtones may eclipse singles sales for the music industry.

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Easy ringtones for Virgin Mobile

on May 25, 2004 by Martina Comments

In the UK Virgin Mobile has launched an online campaign which allows users to pick their favourite ringtone directly from the ad. They can listen to the ringtone and then text a number to receive it, without visiting a Web site.

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Online advertising’s happy days

on May 25, 2004 by Martina Comments

Ad:Tech 2004 is currently taking place in San Francisco. It’s a good occasion to meet and to discuss problems and potentials of a difficult market, still looking for its identity. Kris Oser on Advertising Age says “Happy Days are here again” quoting the opinions of a few industry players. To read more about Ad:Tech 2004 you can also check out eWeek (via Yahoo!).

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Let’s mobilize (everything)

on May 25, 2004 by Martina Comments

No matter what the content is, you can get it on your mobile. SMS, MMS, WAP and UMTS. The potentials for mobile content are huge as an article on New Media Age explains today. There is a rush to mobilise all existing and new content. It’s a pity the article simply reports a few information and doesn’t provide the author’s opinion about the market evolution. I’m always negative when I read too much optimism and no analysis.

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Is mobile video taking off in the US?

on May 25, 2004 by Martina Comments

Actually the article’s title on Cellular News is not a question, rather it’s a statement, based on a recent research by In-Stat/MDR. They found out that found that “13.2% of U.S. wireless subscribers are extremely or very interested in purchasing video services for their wireless phones”. Are we sure this is a good news? With all the respect, Americans don’t even know how to send sms (probably they simply don’t care). How come they are willing to pay for video content? I feel like wireless industry players in the US are trying to build up an hype about the market, exaggerating about present and future growth. Let’s keep feet on the ground, trying not to spoil the real market potentials.

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Videogames and advertising (again)

on May 24, 2004 by Martina Comments

As the Latins used to say: panem et circenses. The worst the economy, the more people spends in entertainment. Then add the identity’s crisis of the man in contemporary society, and you can easily understand why the gaming industry at the moment is flourishing. Following the motto “place your ad where the prospect is”, the advertising industry is ready to “invade” videogames. Yes, we aren’t talking about advergaming nor about product placement, this is actually an invasion, a rush to place a banner, a claim, a logo, on any spot a customer (he’s not a man anymore…) could consciously or unconsciously note. I’m rather negative towards this topic, I can’t help but considering it from the customer perspective. I’m annoyed by the idea of product placement in the movies, which is actually corrupting the output’s quality. I fear the same might happen with videogames, since, as AdAge writes today, “advergaming grows in reach and power”. Actually the article isn’t only about product placement in videogames, rather it’s about interactive gaming in general, considering also MMO (massively multiplayer online) and, of course, the “simple” advergames. There is also an interactive games report to download.

Connect, before it’s too late

on May 24, 2004 by Martina Comments

“Online creative is not very creative” says Jeremy Lockhorn on his latest column on ClickZ. I guess you already heard this sentence, but I’m also pretty much sure you don’t remember the solution to the problem. A “call for creativity” is a usual grief from the online advertising industry, unfortunately it’s not so easy to exactly explain what creativity actually is (especially on the Web). A reference to interactivity might help but, in general, I would says that online creativity is the ability to fully take advantage of the medium’s characteristics: multimediality, immediacy, interactivity. As Jeremy explains, video can play a crucial role in enhancing the creativity level and also the quality of online ads. The point is we need to connect with consumers from the very first beginning of the relationship. But, at the same time, we need to “respect” our target, being polite with our advertising messages, asking for a sort of permission when presenting ads in unusual or intrusive formats.

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Pepsi & Apple: let’s do it again

on May 24, 2004 by Martina Comments

Despite the failure of their first co-marketing initiative, Apple and Pepsi have decided to do it again. This time instead of the US, they have decided to target the Australian market with a campaign supported by mobile phones. As Macworld UK reports, Australian Pepsi drinkers with a cell phone, can enter the competition via SMS and win an iPod an hour for six weeks.

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