Digital advertising and marketing: only the best ideas worldwide, since 2003

Your wilting lettuce is texting you

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

Rotting food, in supermarket shelves and in our own refrigerators, is a big problem. So big in fact, that it weights 7 million tons.

To solve it or, at least minimize it, scientists created a microchip that when inserted into food packaging communicates the freshness of the food inside. As the shelf-life and expiration date nears, the package starts texting the owner, alerting them to consume the food before it goes bad.

Now, the question is, would we care? After all, if all we ever eat is nearly-deceased vegetables, then our diet becomes a race against rot. More environmentally & socially conscious among us will welcome this innovation, though. The rumor is that, Holland, always the innovator, is going to implement this technology pretty soon. Stay tuned.

Follow me @andjelicaaa

Have you got your disloyalty card?

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

Here’s what you do if you really, really dislike Starbucks. You create DC Disloyalty Card. The benefits, according to the two barista founders, are too many to count. First, by acquiring a disloyalty card, consumers firmly put themselves in the “let’s support the local coffee shops” team. Then, they express their anti-corporate sentiment. Then, they probably also feel good about themselves because of the above two. And finally, they enjoy some damn good local coffee.

So how does the disloyalty card work? Apparently, one needs to buy a coffee from the six participating local shops, and their seventh cup will be free. Get it? By being disloyal to one single coffee shop, consumers get rewarded to a free drink. They also get to know their local coffee shops, taste different kinds of coffee, and try something new. Being disloyal pays off, but only in this one instance

Follow me @andjelicaaa

 

How would you look if you weren’t photoshopped? Aerie finds out.

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

This is something more of lingerie brands would do if they had the balls. Featuring real-life, non-skinny women so far has helped only Dove to be an iconic brand with its “Real Beauty” campaign, but lingerie brands were slow to respond. Not anymore.

Aerie (an American Eagle company) launched “Aerie Real” campaign showing un-Photoshopped models. They look amazing and the entire campaign is super-refreshing. The effort is even more meaningful knowing Aerie’s audience: adolescent girls who are still figuring out their body image.

There’s also #aeriereal social component to the campaign, where girls submit their own photos. I’d really love to see the sales figures after this campaign, hope that it worked!

Follow me @andjelicaaa

 

Mood-based ad serving. Why not?

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

Very rarely any of us likes to see an ad on our mobile phone. But what if the mood is right? That’s exactly what Apple is experimenting with. The next-gen ad serving will look at things like time of the day, location, current activity, mood, heart rate, blood pressure, adrenaline level, body temperature and other parameters and determine our emotional state. For this, of course, we need  a wearable tech device, but Apple’s already working on that too.

Advertisers should be thrilled, but then again, knowing Apple, it’s probably going to be a pricey, closed system.

Follow me @andjelicaaa

Bloomingdale’s Does Super-Bowl

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

For anyone who lives in the U.S. and works in advertising, there is no bigger annual event than Super Bowl. It’s the time when brands go crazy, on the TV-screen and off. And when I say that brands go crazy, I mean all brands. Even those that – for all intents and purposes – have nothing to do with either football, men or beer. But, brands being all about in-the-moment relevance, it comes as no surprise that Bloomingdale’s wanted to jump the Super Bowl wagon. The retailer created a fashion/football auction where the lucky bidder can win one of the helmets exclusively designed by one of the 48 designers ranging from unknown rookies to Cynthia Rowley. All proceeds are going to NFL Foundation. Fashion touchdown!

Follow me @andjelicaaa

Let’s go shopping, it costs only a tweet!

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

Marc Jacobs will open a pop-up store on West Broadway in Soho on Feb 7-9th. Nothing remarkable about that, right? Well, not so fast. The only currency this store accepts are Tweets. Yes, that’s correct. You can “buy” a range of MJ accessories, designed to promote MJ’s perfume Daisy, only if you share the hashtag #MJDaisyChain with your social graph. Coincidentally (or not quite) New York Fashion Week happens at the same time pop-up shop will be open, so expect a flurry of fashionistas in hunt for MJ memorabilia. This is a pretty awesome awareness campaign, that’s accompanied by a Sofia Coppola-directed film and a print campaign promoting the perfume.

Follow me @andjelicaaa

 

Brothers, Sisters, Sons & Daughters: Masterful. Bold. Bravo, Barneys New York

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

In an admirably masterful move, Barney’s New York decided to use seventeen transgender persons for their Spring 2014 campaign called “Brothers, Sisters, Sons & Daughters.” The models are stunning, and Barneys sent a powerful message to our culture. The campaign was exclusively launched on The Window, and was shot by Bruce Weber.

Follow me @andjelicaaa

 

Pinterest gets a cyborg-like upgrade: Rich Pins will blow your mind

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

There are article pins, product pins, place pins, recipe pins and movie pins. And all of them contain information that is just what you are looking for. Retailers, hotels, publishers, CPG brands are somewhere rubbing their hands in delight. This is contextual advertising at its best, mixed with a heavy dollop of utility. The sexiest of them all are product pins, clearly, as they are the perfect outlet for relevant product information: price, availability, shopping and, of course, the opportunity to shop. And all of this without ever leaving the Pinterest universe. Make no mistake: retailers benefit plenty – once user decided to buy a product, the rest of the transaction is completed on the retailer website. The bottom of the funnel is the same – it’s its top that has gotten more complex, and for the better.

Follow me @andjelicaaa

Warby Parker for mattresses? Sure, bring it on!

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

In the domain of online shopping, there are some things that are thought to be off-limits. Like sunglasses. Like shoes. Like mattresses. Apparently, this perception all wrong, as Warby Parker, TOMS and now Tuft and Needle have demonstrated. The latter is the foam-mattress business that sells its much-loved products exclusively online, through their website and via Amazon, bypassing distributors and all the hustles that go with them.

What’s the next industry to be disrupted? Hair-color, perhaps?

Follow me @andjelicaaa

File under: ,

Sensory fiction: sure, as long as we aren’t reading about Frankenstein

on February 1, 2014 by Ana Comments

So get this: scientist at MIT used temperature and lighting to create a book that conveys to readers the emotional states of its characters. Depending on the page the reader is on, the book changed the “mood” via ambient lighting and vibrations to convey emotional atmosphere of the story. There’s a wearable vest involved as well, that vibrates, changes pressure, and temperature, but that’s a bit further out. Either way, identification with the characters of fiction has never been closer. Read further here.

Follow me @andjelicaaa

Advertise here